Aslan Karatsev of Russia Continues an Unlikely Run at Australian Open


He is the mystery man who few in the sport had heard of just days ago. But Aslan Karatsev of Russia has landed in the semifinals of the Australian Open.In one of the most unlikely runs in the history of modern tennis, Karatsev on Tuesday became one of the few players to make the final four of a Grand Slam after surviving the qualifying tournament when he beat an ailing Grigor Dimitrov of Bulgaria in four sets 2-6, 6-4, 6-1, 6-2.Karatsev, 27, who was born in Russia, moved to Israel as a child, then returned to Russia as a teenager to pursue better tennis training, according to The Times of Israel. He had been playing in the tennis hinterlands for several years with little success. He had never qualified for a Grand Slam before this tournament. He won three straight matches at the Australian Open qualifying event in Doha to win a spot in the main event and came in ranked No. 114 in the world. He has never been ranked higher than No. 111.Dimitrov appeared to have the match under control after the first set but suffered what looked to be back spasms in the third set and appeared to be on the edge of retiring for the rest of the match.Just four other players have made the semifinals of a Grand Slam after getting through the qualifying event.Ahead of the Australian Open, he played doubles for Team Russia in the ATP Cup, a team event in which players represent their countries. Russia won the competition, but not because of Karatsev, who lost all three matches in which he played with two different partners.His teammates noticed that he was playing as well as they had ever seen, and yet none of them would have predicted anything like this.“We felt like he could do something amazing,” Daniil Medvedev, Russia’s top player and the No. 4 seed in the Australian Open. “To be honest, being in your first Grand Slam main draw? Making quarters is something exceptional. He’s not over yet.”He certainly is not.Karatsev will take on the winner of the match between Novak Djokovic and Alexander Zverev, which is scheduled for Tuesday night.

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

An American Made Week 2 at the Australian Open. He Avoided Djokovic and Nadal.


Isner, 35, is the lone American in the top 30. In the 1990s, just as tennis was becoming a truly global sport, Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Jim Courier were mainstays of the top 10. Canada, which is about one-tenth of the size of the United States, has three men in the top 20. Also, the Australian Open takes place on a hardcourt, the surface that most Americans grow up playing on.“I think I’m more than capable, but it’s a matter of not what I do against Novak but what do you do every day,” Tiafoe, 23, said after he had lost his hard-fought four-set, three-and-a-half-hour battle with Djokovic. “Those matches, losing matches, I don’t think I should.”Fritz came a step closer to beating Djokovic on Friday night, pushing him to five sets as Djokovic struggled through an injury he described as a torn muscle on the right side of his midsection. Fritz appeared to have Djokovic beaten early in the fifth set but fell short as Djokovic began pounding serves and ripping forehands into the corners, as he had early on in the match.An hour after it ended, Fritz remained distraught over too many missed first serves and errors off his forehand. He had taken Djokovic to a tiebreaker in the first set and had then lost seven of the next eight points.“It’s very motivating that we’re so close, but at the same time, we are so far,” Fritz said. “These guys are so good.”And so it was that McDonald, perhaps the most unlikely of all of his countrymen, became the last hope to put an American into the second week of the year’s first Grand Slam. McDonald showed promise three years ago when, not long after leaving U.C.L.A., he made it to the fourth round of Wimbledon, where he lost to Milos Raonic of Canada.Less than a year later, he sustained a torn hamstring tendon while playing doubles at the French Open and underwent surgery. After the operation, he couldn’t leave his apartment for three weeks, and he couldn’t walk for the better part of two months. Slowly, week by week, he began to allow his leg to bear more weight.

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

Trust Me, Sports Without Fans Is Not Sports


MELBOURNE, Australia — For roughly the past two decades, the analytics crowd has peddled the idea that sports is essentially math, that what unfolds on the field of play is predictable and intelligible if viewed through a proper algorithm. Occasionally that crowd has even been right. And in many ways the pandemic sports environment was an analytics aficionado’s dream, a chance for games to unfold in a laboratory, free of the noise, both literal and figurative, that can turn an expected outcome into a beautiful mess.Now, nearly a year into the coronavirus pandemic, we really do know the roar of the crowd is as vital to sports as a ball or a net. The artificial crowd noise that Major League Baseball, the N.F.L., the N.B.A. and the N.H.L. have piped in, both for those in the stadiums and arenas and for people watching at home, is a terrible facsimile that makes the spectator-free games feel nothing like sports at all. What stage actors refer to as the “fourth wall” — the metaphorical barrier between performers and spectators — doesn’t exist in sports. A crowd’s passion can seemingly help power comebacks. Its scorn can smother one, too. For five glorious days at the 2021 Australian Open, I got to experience that noise again, because government officials allowed up to 30,000 fans, about 50 percent capacity, to attend the tournament each day. It was both a joy and a revelation to rediscover the power of what the quantum physicists call the “observer effect” — the fact that any observation, however passive, alters an outcome — even in a half-capacity crowd of tennis fans. Sports felt like Sports once more.Then on Friday, the coronavirus did what it has done so relentlessly for the past 11 months: It shut down the party. A recent outbreak was what much of the world would consider a nuisance. But in Australia, which has managed the pandemic more effectively than any other major economy, it qualified as a critical mass.The cluster of coronavirus cases grew to more than a dozen, and the state government of Victoria, where Melbourne is, declared a “snap lockdown” of five days, beginning at midnight Friday.Everyone, except those deemed essential workers, must stay home, though two hours of outdoor exercise and one hour to go to the grocery store or pharmacy are permitted. Players and people considered essential in running the Australian Open will be allowed at Melbourne Park. Spectators, sadly, must stay away until perhaps the singles semifinals, scheduled to start Thursday.“The players will compete in a bubble not dissimilar to what they have done throughout the year,” said Craig Tiley, the chief executive of Tennis Australia, which organizes the tournament.No one is happy about it.“It’s been really fun to have the crowd back, especially here,” Serena Williams said after she beat Anastasia Potapova in straight sets in the third round Friday. “But, you know what, at the end of the day we have to do what’s best. Hopefully it will be all right.”I am here to tell you it won’t be. After what I witnessed during the first five days, it’s going to be terrible, without the essential dynamics that make sports the ultimate in improvisational theater.Nick Kyrgios, the tennis antihero everywhere except Australia, where he is beloved, rode the fans to a miracle Wednesday night. He saved two match points in the fourth set against Ugo Humbert, the rising 22-year-old Frenchmen. Then he edged Humbert in the fifth set in front of an explosive crowd that never gave up on its hometown hero.Kyrgios is the rare tennis player who brings in rugby fans. They screamed their heads off to keep Kyrgios alive and Humbert, the No. 29 seed, on edge until the very last point.“Half-packed and it felt like it was a full stadium,” Kyrgios said. “I got goose bumps toward the end.”Humbert lost those two match points, even though he was serving. He heard the fireworks from the seats a few feet away. As he watched Kyrgios both encourage it and soak it all in, his eyes appeared to fill with fear. There was another set to play, but the crowd was not going to let Humbert get out alive.It is not a stretch to say that Humbert wins that match easily on a quiet court.Kyrgios and his crew were back at it Friday night, when he took on Dominic Thiem of Austria, the reigning United States Open champion. The roars started as Kyrgios broke Thiem in the first game. As the crowd bellowed, Kyrgios waved his arms and cupped his ear, signaling to his fans that if he had any chance against the machine-like No. 3 seed, they were it.And so began three-plus hours of interactive drama, with all the seat-banging, taunting and fist-pumping needed for someone who has barely played in a year to stay competitive with one of the best players on the planet. As the match stretched into the fifth set and past 10:30 p.m., a strange clock watching began, because fans were supposed to be home and observing lockdown by midnight.In the end it wasn’t enough, as Thiem prevailed in five sets, 4-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4, but it’s hard to believe it would have been close without it. “It’s not the same sport without the crowd,” Kyrgios said.So, here is one big reveal of the past week: All those star athletes who have always insisted they are so locked in that they do not hear the crowd? Well, it seems pretty clear they have been lying.Here was Novak Djokovic, who has won this championship eight times. He has described Rod Laver Arena as his backyard. He was getting ready to play a game the other day, when a clump of women with a Serbian flag stood up and serenaded him with the “Ole-Ole” tune, culminating with, “Novak Djokovic is hot, hot, hot!”Djokovic gave up on trying to play cool. He stepped back from the court, started giggling, then shook his head to regain his focus.Here was Ajla Tomljanovic of Australia, trying to serve out the third set for what would have likely been the biggest win of her career, an upset of Simona Halep, the No. 2 seed. She was in front of a hometown crowd that carried her all night but couldn’t will her to victory.“I felt that rush of people just cheering for you,” Tomljanovich said, her voice breaking following the loss. “I’m afraid to say it, but it could be the highlight of the year with the atmosphere and the crowd.”She is not the only one. I do not know what I am dreading more about the end of this assignment — the last freezing month of a winter in the Northeast, or the largely empty version of sports that the pandemic has wrought.It’s something, yes, but it is not sports.

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

Goodbye to Fans at the Australian Open


All morning, rumors swirled around the tournament grounds, whipped into a tempest by spectators half-watching matches while they scrolled through their news feeds and studied texts from friends and family members.After Andrews confirmed the worst of the rumors, a bottleneck formed in the aisles, with spectators exiting the stadium to call airlines to rebook flights hurrying past those still filing inside. Two fans, Lauren Grundeman and Belinda Brown, waited until after Williams closed out her match to call Qantas Airways. Anticipating that flight schedules would be slashed in the coming days because of the lockdown, they wanted to move up their return travel to Sydney and leave in a few hours’ time.“We were too late,” Grundeman said. “All the flights today sold out a half-hour ago.”Grundeman and Brown considered themselves fortunate to secure seats for a Saturday afternoon return. They weren’t sorry that they came. It was worth the inconvenience, they said, to see Williams inch closer to a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles title.“Definitely,” Brown said. “Serena is amazing.”Williams is a charismatic headliner, but the atmosphere was lacking its usual fizz, said Grundeman, who regularly attends the Australian Open. The lines to get inside, which are usually long, were nonexistent on Friday. There were no Swedes with national colors painted on their faces. No Dutch decked head to toe in orange. Grundeman described the energy as “flat.”Friday’s announced attendance, on a day tailor-made for soaking up the sun and world-class groundstrokes, was 22,299. Many Melburnians had said in interviews and letters to newspapers that they were forgoing this year’s event out of an abundance of caution. Brown said she couldn’t blame them.“If I was local, I’d be a bit like, we don’t need people coming and bring extra cases,” she said.Julie Dunlop rose before the sun and phoned her daughter. They held tickets to the day session Friday but Dunlop was discomfited by television reports that a lockdown — or “the dreaded L-word,” as she called it — was imminent. Should they soak up the sunshine before holing up in their houses? Or was the prudent play to stay away?

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

ชาวออสเตรเลียเปิดบ้านพบกับความสำเร็จหลังจากปีที่ไม่มีเทนนิสมากนัก


เมลเบิร์นออสเตรเลีย – Ashleigh Barty ปรากฏตัวในสองรอบแรกของ Australian Open ไม่แปลกใจเลยที่บาร์ตี้วัย 24 ปีเป็นผู้หญิงที่ติดอันดับโลก ยกเว้นว่า Barty ถูกปลดออกจากงานเกือบหนึ่งปีก่อนการแข่งขัน Australian Open เพราะเขาเลือกที่จะไม่ออกจากออสเตรเลียซึ่งเป็นประเทศบ้านเกิดของเขาโดยส่วนใหญ่ในปี 2020 เนื่องจากการแพร่ระบาดของไวรัสโคโรนา Nick Kyrgios นักเทนนิสยอดนิยมของออสเตรเลียใช้เวลา 11 เดือนที่ผ่านมาที่บ้านในแคนเบอร์ราเช่นเดียวกันข้ามรายการ Grand Slam สองรายการและโอกาสในการเล่นเกมอื่น ๆ เขาหลงใหลในทัวร์นาเมนต์เมื่อคืนวันพุธเมื่อเขากลับมาจากสองแต้มการแข่งขันในเซตที่สี่กับอูโกฮัมเบิร์ตหมายเลขเมล็ดพันธุ์ 29 และชนะในอันดับที่ 5 ต่อหน้าฝูงชนที่มีพลังไฟฟ้า ความสำเร็จของพวกเขาจนถึงตอนนี้และพี่น้องชาวออสเตรเลียบางคนได้ปลุกจิตวิญญาณของแฟนเทนนิสชาวออสเตรเลียซึ่งทุกคนคุ้นเคยกับการหยุดชะงักอย่างต่อเนื่องที่เกิดจากเชื้อไวรัสแม้ในประเทศที่จัดการกับการแพร่ระบาดได้อย่างไม่มีข้อสงสัย เศรษฐกิจที่สำคัญใด ๆ ในโลก ผู้เล่นชาวออสเตรเลียสูญเสียรางวัลเงินสดนับล้านและมีโอกาสมากขึ้นในการเล่นในด่านที่ใหญ่ที่สุดของกีฬา แต่พวกเขาก็มีรูปร่างดี “ไม่เสียใจสำหรับฉันอย่างแน่นอน” บาร์ตี้กล่าวในสัปดาห์นี้ขณะที่เขาเตรียมพร้อมที่จะเล่นกับน้ำหนักบนไหล่ของประเทศและความแห้งแล้งของเขาในการแข่งขันชิงแชมป์เดี่ยววัย 42 ปีที่ Australian Open การตัดสินใจที่ยากลำบากที่ Barty และเพื่อนร่วมงานชาวออสเตรเลียต้องเผชิญนั้นยากที่จะแก้ไขและผู้เล่นจากประเทศอื่น ๆ อาจรู้สึกกดดันเช่นเดียวกันเมื่อข้อ จำกัด ในการเดินทางเปลี่ยนไป ยังคงกำหนดให้ผู้โดยสารทั้งหมดที่เดินทางมาจากนอกประเทศภายในสิ้นปีนี้จะต้องถูกกักกันในห้องพักของโรงแรมที่ได้รับการตรวจสอบเป็นเวลาสองสัปดาห์ เป็นเวลาหลายเดือนแล้วที่แคนาดาขอให้ผู้ที่เข้ามาในประเทศทำการกักกันเป็นเวลาสองสัปดาห์โดยอาจมีการตรวจสอบโดยสำนักงานตำรวจแห่งชาติแคนาดา ในเดือนมกราคมแคนาดาได้เพิ่มข้อ จำกัด เหล่านี้และกำหนดให้ต้องพักในห้องพักของโรงแรมเป็นเวลาสามคืนสำหรับนักเดินทางทางอากาศทุกคนที่เข้ามาในขณะที่รอผลการทดสอบไวรัส นโยบายบังคับให้ผู้เล่นในประเทศเหล่านี้มีทางเลือกที่ยากลำบากพวกเขาตัดสินใจที่จะเล่นและอดทนต่อการเดินทางระหว่างประเทศทั้งหมดที่นักเทนนิสอาชีพต้องการพวกเขาไม่สามารถกลับบ้านได้จนกว่าจะสิ้นสุดฤดูกาลในเดือนพฤศจิกายนหากพวกเขาไม่เลือกที่จะเข้าร่วม หยุดพักที่สำคัญ ไม่มีใครมีคำตอบที่ดี Felix Auger-Aliassime ชาวแคนาดาวัย 20 ปีซึ่งมีรายชื่อที่อยู่อาศัยของเขาในโมนาโก แต่ยังคงมีความผูกพันอย่างลึกซึ้งกับมอนทรีออลกล่าวว่าเขากำลังพยายามคิดว่าเมื่อไหร่ที่เขาจะได้เห็นน้องสาวและพ่อแม่ของเขาในระหว่างปีนี้ เขาถูกกักบริเวณเป็นเวลาสองสัปดาห์เมื่อเขากลับไปแคนาดาเมื่อปีที่แล้ว แต่ไม่แน่ใจว่าเขาจะสามารถจัดการมันได้อีกเมื่อไหร่ Milos Raonic ชาวแคนาดาอีกคนที่อยู่ในมอนติคาร์โลกล่าวว่าเขาไม่น่าจะเล่นเต็มฤดูกาล เขาบอกว่าเขาเห็นพ่อแม่ของเขาแค่ห้าวันเมื่อปีที่แล้วแทนที่จะเป็นเดือนเหมือนในปีปกติ “ครอบครัวของฉันและคนที่ใกล้ชิดกับฉันมีความสำคัญเกินกว่าที่จะละเลยแง่มุมนั้นในชีวิตของฉัน” ราโอนิกกล่าวเมื่อวันพุธหลังจากชนะรอบที่สองกับเบอร์นาร์ดโทมิกชาวออสเตรเลียซึ่งแผนการเล่นเทนนิสในอนาคตก็มีอยู่บ้างเช่นกัน ” มันไม่ใช่เรื่องง่าย “Tomic กล่าวหลังจากการสูญเสีย” ถ้าฉันออกจากออสเตรเลียตอนนี้ฉันจะไม่กลับมาในเร็ว ๆ นี้แน่นอน ” Ajla Tomljanovic หนึ่งในชาวออสเตรเลียที่เล่นในต่างประเทศเมื่อช่วงฤดูร้อนและฤดูใบไม้ร่วงที่ผ่านมากล่าวว่าความไม่แน่นอนของโปรแกรมและความท้าทายในการออกจากเกมดังกล่าวสร้างความหายนะให้กับเกมของเธอมานาน “ฉันมองไม่ไกลไปกว่าวันพรุ่งนี้” Tomljanovic หลังจาก การสูญเสีย Simona Halep อย่างโหดร้ายต่อ Tomljanovich หมายเลข 1 เมล็ดพันธุ์ชนะในเซตแรกและนำ 5-2 ในอันดับที่สามจากนั้นแพ้ห้าเกมติดต่อกัน “ทุกอย่างไม่เป็นที่รู้จักมากอะไรสามารถเปลี่ยนแปลงได้ในทุกวินาที” นั่นคือส่วนหนึ่งของสิ่งที่ Barty, Kyrgios, Tomic อดีตแชมป์ US Open Sam Stosur และชาวออสเตรเลียคนอื่น ๆ รับรู้เมื่อปีที่แล้วเมื่อพวกเขาเปลี่ยนไปใช้การแข่งขันเทนนิสที่ฟื้นคืนชีพแทนที่จะจัดการกับความไม่แน่นอนของไวรัสและนโยบายที่เข้มงวดในออสเตรเลียซึ่งเป็นเวลาหลายเดือนแม้จะมีการ จำกัด การเดินทางระหว่างกัน รัฐ Kyrgios เป็นที่รู้จักในความสัมพันธ์แบบรักและเกลียดกับเกมนี้ Tom กำลังพยายามสร้างอาชีพที่มีแนวโน้มของเขาเมื่ออายุ 28 ปี Stosur, l เด็กวัย 36 ปีชนะนัดแรกในรายการ Australian Open ในปี 2015 ทุกคนบอกว่าพวกเขาไม่ได้สัมผัสไม้เทนนิสมาหลายเดือนแล้วโดยใช้เวลาในเกมเป็นตัวรีเซ็ต หุ้นส่วนของ Stosur ให้กำเนิดทารกเพศหญิงในเดือนมิถุนายน Barty ยอมแพ้มากที่สุด – โอกาสพิเศษในการเล่นในฐานะผู้เล่นชั้นนำของโลกและโอกาสในการป้องกันแชมป์เฟรนช์โอเพ่นของเขา เขาใช้เวลาเพียงเล็กน้อยในการติดตามหรือดูเทนนิส “มันเป็นเรื่องของการมีความสุขกับเวลาอยู่บ้านมากกว่าและรู้สึกขอบคุณและขอบคุณในสิ่งที่ฉันมี” เธอกล่าว เขาเล่นกอล์ฟมาก เธอเข้าร่วมการแข่งขันฟุตบอลลีกของออสเตรเลียและถ่ายรูปกับเบียร์ในมือในรอบชิงชนะเลิศระหว่างบริสเบนและริชมอนด์ เขามีสุนัขอีกตัวคือ Border Collie จากนั้นในฤดูกาลเทนนิสออสเตรเลียที่เส้นขอบฟ้าเขาเริ่มทำงาน เมื่อมองแวบแรกไม่ชัดเจนว่าอะไรทำให้ Barty มีประสิทธิภาพ ด้วยความสูง 5 ฟุต 5 เธอถูกสร้างขึ้นเพื่อเป็นกองกลางฟุตบอลและมีขนาดเล็กกว่าคู่แข่งชั้นยอดหลายคน เขาขาดการเสิร์ฟที่น่ากลัวและระเบิดอย่างที่ผู้เล่น 20 อันดับแรกมีเขามีช็อตที่แข็งแกร่งแม้ว่าจะไม่ท่วมท้น – แต่ก็มีผู้เล่นไม่กี่คนที่มีความฟิต มันสามารถป้องกันทุกมุมของสนามได้ในจุดเดียวและแทบจะไม่หายใจหนัก ที่ไหล่และแขนส่วนบนของเธอดูเหมือนมีกล้ามเนื้อ เธอยังผสมผสานสไตล์ที่ไม่หยุดยั้งกับการย้อนกลับที่ซับซ้อน เขาเสนอให้ฟรีเล็กน้อยแม้ว่าจะเล็งไปที่ข้างสนามซึ่งเขามักจะทำและมีทักษะในการค้นหาจุดอ่อนของคู่ต่อสู้และแยกแยะความแตกต่างของเขา “ ความฉลาดในการเล่นเทนนิสของเธอนั้นเหลือเชื่อมาก” ดาเรียกาฟริโลวาผู้ซึ่งแพ้บาร์ตี้เมื่อวันพฤหัสบดีและเป็นตัวแทนของออสเตรเลียในทีมชาติกล่าว “ก่อนที่จะเสมอกันเรามักจะเล่นการวิเคราะห์ของทีมเช่นการวิเคราะห์ของฝ่ายตรงข้ามและมันจะตรงจุดเสมอ เธออยู่ในจุดที่ทุกครั้ง “หลังจากหมดเวลาไปแล้ว Barty ไม่ได้ดูแย่ลงเนื่องจากขาดการสึกหรอ เธอชนะการแข่งขันเพลงเมื่อสัปดาห์ที่แล้วโดยเอาชนะGarbiñe Muguruza ผู้ชนะแกรนด์สแลมคู่ในรอบชิงชนะเลิศจากนั้นเริ่มการแข่งขัน Australian Open ด้วยชัยชนะ 6-0, 6-0 ในขณะที่เล่นกับ Gavrilova บาร์ตี้สวมรอบขาซ้ายบนของเขาเพื่อพยุงกล้ามเนื้อ (เคยเป็นนักกลยุทธ์เขาปฏิเสธที่จะพูดว่า) เธอยืนยันว่าอาการปวดกล้ามเนื้อและปัญหาชุดที่สองไม่ได้น่าเป็นห่วงหรือเป็นอาการของสนิม “ฉันหลงทางนิดหน่อย” เธอกล่าวถึงส่วนที่เป็นหินของการแข่งขัน เห็นได้ชัดว่าเขาพบเธอตามเส้นทางที่น่าประหลาดใจอย่างน้อยก็ในตอนนี้ เธอและชาวออสเตรเลียคนอื่น ๆ จมอยู่กับความสำเร็จที่น่าทึ่งของประเทศคือโควิด -19 ซึ่งประเทศจะไม่หดตัว “คุณต้องทำในสิ่งที่ดีที่สุดสำหรับคุณและคุณอยู่ที่ไหนและอยู่ที่ไหนตลอดทั้งปี” Lleyton Hewitt ชาวออสเตรเลียคนสุดท้ายที่คว้าอันดับ 1 ของโลกกล่าว “มีความคิดมากมายที่ไม่ต้องกลายเป็นนักเทนนิสออสเตรเลียในตอนนี้”

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

Novak Djokovic and Nick Kyrgios Trade Shots Off the Court


MELBOURNE, Australia — Novak Djokovic’s flat verbal volley was catnip for Nick Kyrgios, who gleefully blasted a return. “Bang,” he muttered under his breath, “Nailed him.”Kyrgios made his point at an Australian Open news conference, not on the court, where he last faced Djokovic in 2017. Over months and across time zones, the men have engaged in what amounts to the longest rally of the season, a seesaw of snark that has captivated an audience drawn to the catty Real Housewives of Melbourne vibe.Kyrgios called Djokovic “a tool.” Djokovic said he has no respect for Kyrgios off the court. Kyrgios called Djokovic “a very strange cat.” A weary Djokovic sighed and said, “Great.”The ball was back in Kyrgios’s court on Wednesday, but he was too exhausted after his electrifying five-set comeback victory over the 29th-seeded Frenchman, Ugo Humbert, to take another swipe at Djokovic, who is also through to Friday’s third round.Any other year, a war of words between the two would be as riveting as a plastic knife fight. Djokovic is the eight-time defending champion and the men’s world No. 1 who next month will tie (and probably pass) Roger Federer’s record of 310 weeks at the top.Kyrgios is ranked 47th, with six career ATP titles. He has never advanced past the quarterfinals in a Grand Slam event and has been known more for his meltdowns than any milestones. Kyrgios’s victory against Humbert offered a three-hour tour of his jagged internal terrain; the brilliant shots and the bellicose storms that left in their trail one smashed racket, two code violations and an earful of expletives.“If you were inside my head, there were some dark thoughts in there,” Kyrgios conceded.Any other year, even at his home Slam, Kyrgios, a Canberra native, would be the tantrum-thrower in the cereal aisle that all the adults gave a wide berth. But this is the first Australian Open played since the coronavirus pandemic halted sports and shut schools, displaced workers and residents and closed state and international borders.Kyrgios, 25, who has a residence in the Bahamas, idled at his family home in Australia’s capital during the five-month coronavirus-imposed halt to competition. His exposure to Australia’s rigorous one-for-all, all-for-one approach to the pandemic, one that embraced social distancing, masks and hand-washing but also testing, contact tracing, limited interstate travel, curfews and confinement, broadened his perspective beyond elite sport’s I-for-me, me-for-I mantra.Tennis’s bad boy became its social media Bard, giving voice to the hardships he saw all around him. He helped where he could, be it raising money for bushfire survivors or buying and distributing food to the housebound in his hometown.On the other side of the world, tennis’s reigning king was looking out for his community, too. Djokovic, 33, was hunkered down in Serbia, one of the European countries lightly impacted by the pandemic. Djokovic, a millionaire many times over, recognized the financial hardships faced by lower-ranked players, which he sought to ameliorate by organizing, and headlining, a two-week, four-city Balkans exhibition tour in June.Serbia’s lockdown had been lifted, but the lack of social distancing during the events, which attracted large crowds, and the photos that emerged of shirtless tennis stars dancing the night away in clubs, offended players who were lonely and locked down in their homes. When three coaches, two wives and four players, including Djokovic, tested positive for the coronavirus, leading to the cancellation of the event, the backlash was swift.Leading the verbal attack was Kyrgios, who decried the tour as a “bonehead decision” and suggested that Djokovic, as the game’s top player, needed to be held accountable for his actions.When the ATP season resumed in August Kyrgios opted out because he didn’t want to travel. And so it wasn’t until last month, when Djokovic arrived in Australia and began a mandatory 14-day quarantine that Kyrgios’s bubble and Djokovic’s bubble collided in full view of Australian journalists badly in need of a frothy diversion.Djokovic, who had resigned as president of the ATP Player Council last summer to help start what he described as a complementary players’ organization, was on a text string with dozens of players who detailed their quarantine woes.Gathering their complaints, Djokovic sent Craig Tiley, the Tennis Australia CEO, a list that reflected the requests, which included easing the quarantine period and access to private homes with tennis courts, similar to what was available to players at their own expense in New York during last year’s United States Open.“I offered to help with my position, my status, my name, with my connection to Craig, this group of over 100 players who were communicating on a daily basis what are the things they were missing,” Djokovic said this week.Djokovic’s missive, which he said was intended for Tiley’s eyes only, was leaked, and Kyrgios called Djokovic out for not appreciating sacrifices made by the Australian public that made the tournament possible.An Australian reporter asked Djokovic for his reaction. He said that Kyrgios, whom he described as “someone that is different,” is good for the sport.“I have respect for him,” Djokovic said. “I have respect for everyone else really because everyone has a right and freedom to choose how they want to express themselves.”He added that he appreciates Kyrgios’s “big game” but that off the court, he doesn’t have much regard for him. Like courier pigeons, Australian news media members carried a Twitter-length version of Djokovic’s message to Kyrgios.“He says he has no respect for you,” a reporter said. “Would you like to say anything?”“He’s a very strange cat, Novak is,” Kyrgios said. “Heck of a tennis player but unfortunately someone that is partying with his shirt off during a global pandemic, I don’t know if I can take any slack from that man.”In Djokovic’s next news conference, Kyrgios’s words were read to him word for word. “Great,” Djokovic replied dismissively.Did he have anything to add? “No,” he said.The next shot could be delivered on the court. They could meet in the semifinals, where their distinct playing styles reflect their personalities. Kyrgios is aggressive, impulsive and, as befits someone who’s easily distracted, armed with a game built for short points.Djokovic has a cartographer’s zeal for precision and discipline. He accepts suffering as the path to enlightenment and is a doggedly earnest defender deft at attacking from seemingly untenable positions.In their verbal exchanges, Djokovic goes on the defensive while Kyrgios bats each barb back like a between-his-legs half-volley.Djokovic can’t win for winning; his 17 Grand Slam singles titles are the third-most in men’s history behind Rafael Nadal and Federer, who both have 20, and yet he travels the world like the third wheel in the public’s two-man love affair. And Kyrgios can’t win for losing. In the second round, he said, he was able to stave off a match point to win the fourth set and then take the fifth because he imagined the headlines had he lost, “almost afraid,” he said, to “take all that negativity in.”Are Djokovic and Kyrgios really so different?Each spent part of Thursday in the Melbourne Park rooting for compatriots. Djokovic cheered Olga Danilovic, whom he is mentoring. Kyrgios watched his doubles partner Thanasi Kokkinakis.Djokovic could have been speaking for both of them when he said he’s never been “the guy who wants to fit in the box.”It’s not hard to picture Kyrgios with his racket raised, applauding him.

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

At the Australian Open, Bianca Andreescu Is the Great Unknown


To Mary Carillo, the former player and longtime tennis analyst, Andreescu is among the most compelling players in the tournament. Carillo compared her to Juan Martín del Potro, who beat Roger Federer to win the U.S. Open when he was just 20, then sustained a series of injuries and never fulfilled the promise of that triumph.“When you see players like Juan-Martín and Bianca burn a hole in the sport the way they did, you know they’ve got the goods,” Carillo said. “You want to watch them put their games up against the very best. You know they can win majors. You want them to hang around and prove it was real, time after time, year after year, become one of the true greats.”Everyone in tennis knows Andreescu has talent to burn. She has power from the baseline and on her serve. She has the athleticism to chase down balls in the corners. At any moment, from any spot on the court, she can cut a slice with so much spin it dances when it lands. All this, plus the experience of winning a Grand Slam title, and she has only played about 50 WTA singles matches.But coming to Australia, Andreescu had not played a match since October 2019. The inactivity would leave most players with little more than a puncher’s chance for success. Andreescu, though, has shown a freakish ability to shake off rust and play deep into tournaments. A back injury kept her out of competition for two months in the fall of 2018. When she came back she won two titles on the lower tier I.T.F. circuit.In 2019, an injury to her right shoulder largely sidelined her from April until August. She returned for the Rogers Cup in Toronto, one of the most high profile tournaments outside of the four majors, and won after Serena Williams retired from the final with back spasms four games into the match. Then she reeled off another seven consecutive wins and became the U.S. Open champion.That is not normal. Angelique Kerber of Germany, the three-time Grand Slam winner, said that when injuries cause long layoffs, it can take months to find the motivation to get on court and go to your limit. “I think that’s the hardest challenge,” Kerber said.

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

At the Australian Open, Sports Flirts With Normalcy


MELBOURNE, Australia — “It’s so good to see people.”This was Naomi Osaka, the three-time Grand Slam champion, moments after her first-round win Monday afternoon at the Australian Open. She stood at a microphone on the court at Rod Laver Arena and peered up at a crowd that seemed, if not normal, then something like it.That was how it was all across the grounds of Melbourne Park on Monday, where international sports returned, however temporarily, to something like it was before most people knew the difference between a coronavirus and the seasonal flu or used the phrase “social distancing” every third sentence.Spectators lined up for tickets. They waited in security lines and figured out if they wanted to eat burgers or stuffed pitas or fish and chips, and decided how many $13 beers they could stomach. Despite a light gray sky, a stiff breeze and temperatures in the low 60s, some lounged on the grass or on couches. The fancier people hung out in the restaurant with a champagne sponsor.It could only safely occur now because the Grand Slam tennis season happens to start in a country that has arguably controlled Covid-19 better than anywhere else, thanks to months of enforced lockdowns, closed borders, thorough testing and contact tracing. Just 909 people in Australia, which has a population of more than 25 million, have died of Covid-19. The country has averaged a half-dozen cases a day during the past two weeks, nearly all of them international arrivals.Photographers lined the show courts that featured the stars, producing a clatter of clicks at choice moments. A video camera operator wandered the stands, capturing fans that wanted to dance and wave on the stadium screens. Music blasted anda stadium M.C. encouraged them to act goofy during breaks in the action.And then there were the roars, missing since games sputtered back to life inside largely empty stadiums, especially when a winner or perfectly played volley came off the racket of an Australian player or one of the stars. There were plenty of both on the courts on Monday — both Williams sisters, Osaka, Novak Djokovic and the local favorite Nick Kyrgios.The smaller the venue, the grander the roar, like on Court 3, a cozy jewel box court where John Millman of Australia played in front of a half-sized crowd of roughly 1,500 fans.“That’s one of the biggest motivations that we have, the source where we draw our energy and strength and motivation,” Djokovic, the world No. 1, said in anticipation of the noisy welcome he received at Rod Laver, on the court where he has won this championship eight times. “Especially at my age and stage of my career, I’m looking to feed off that energy from the crowd.”The players had to endure varying degrees of quarantines for two weeks after they arrived, and 72 of them were forced to remain inside their hotel rooms for 14 days after 10 people on three chartered flights tested positive upon arrival. Then they were set free, and after a week of preparation, Monday delivered its payoff.“Definitely nice to have some people, a lot of people out there,” said Serena Williams, the 23-time Grand Slam champion, after she tore through Laura Siegemund of Germany, 6-1, 6-1.With spectators capped at 30,000 per day, about half that would show up in normal times, Day 1 at Melbourne Park was a far cry from the summer festival that this tournament is supposed to be. Just 17,922 fans showed up, with plenty of tickets going unsold for any number of reasons — weather, a rejiggered schedule that pushed the tournament back three weeks, Aussie kids no longer on summer break, anger that tennis players, tournament officials and international media members got special exemptions to enter the country and brought in new cases of Covid-19.The fans who attend will find differences from previous tournaments.There were Q.R. codes at each gate with spectators expected to register their seats to allow for contact tracing if someone in their section tests positive.Updated Feb. 8, 2021, 1:00 p.m. ETThere were plenty of masks and rules about where and when they must be worn. Local rules require them indoors, but that does not include inside stadiums, unless the retractable roofs are closed. The corridors between outside and the seating bowl count as indoor space, so masks have to be worn there, unless a spectator is eating or drinking in that area.Workers had painted large circles on the grassy knolls where spectators take in the action on big screens to delineate where each group of fans that arrived together should sit.Ryan Knight, who lives a 40-minute drive away and comes every year, was trying to get used to all the open space.It was just past noon, and Knight was enjoying burgers and fries with his mother, Louise, and his partner, Danielle Locke, in a picnic area where he had his choice of tables.When organizers confirmed in December that the tournament was on, Knight knew he would not miss the opportunity.“You can’t live your life in a box,” he said.How long it will take for everyone who used to attend big events like this one to think and act like the Knights do is anyone’s guess. The players hope it won’t be long.“A crowd having that sort of noise, somebody get behind them, can really turn things on for somebody,” said Milos Raonic of Canada, who beat Federico Coria of Argentina in straight sets Monday.Even the usual nuisances were easier to take. In the second set of her match, Venus Williams had to step away from her serve while a mother left the arena to comfort her fussing baby.Later, Williams was asked whether she appreciated the normalcy of the crowd more after not seeing fans for so long.“Yeah, I definitely had to live without it before I could appreciate it, which is oftentimes the case in life for us humans,” she said. “I’m appreciative now.”Karen Crouse contributed reporting.

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน

Almanzors Draw Accolades Down Under


Breeders and buyers anticipating the upcoming first 2-year-olds by Almanzor (Fr) (Wootton Bassett GB) in Europe were provided a boost in recent weeks at the sales in Australia and New Zealand, where the triple Group 1 winner’s first Southern Hemisphere yearlings were warmly received. After his three yearlings sold at Magic Millions averaged A$506,666 with a top price of A$800,000, Almanzor went on to be leading first-season sire at Karaka Book 1 with 43 sold for an average of NZ$190,698.
Almanzor, who is based at his birthplace Haras d’Etreham in France, stands Southern Hemisphere time at Cambridge Stud in New Zealand, where he stood for NZ$30,000 last season. Cambridge Chief Executive Officer Henry Plumptre noted that Almanzor’s fortunes have been on a rising tide ever since his stud deal was secured, beginning with a nod of approval from one of the greatest stallion masters there has ever been.
“Almanzor is a great physical type,” Plumptre said. “It’s very hard to look at him and find fault with his conformation. The first person we put him in front of when he arrived in New Zealand at the back end of 2018 was Sir Patrick Hogan. Patrick looked at him for five or 10 minutes without saying a word, until he said, ‘he’s absolutely perfect.’ He talked about bone below the knee, substance, forearm, shoulder; and the horse has all those attributes.”

After receiving high grades from the man who cultivated the stud careers of the great Sir Tristram and his son Zabeel, Almanzor went on to post promising results with his first European crop at the foal sales in 2019 and again at last year’s yearling sales. His 14 first-crop foals sold averaged £84,522/€96,461, while his 53 yearlings sold at auction last year built on that solid foundation with an average of £87,023/€99,323. In the meantime his sire, Wootton Bassett, was continuing to go from strength to strength.
“At the time [that the breeding rights deal was done for Almanzor] Wootton Bassett was a bit of an unknown quantity,” Plumptre recalled. “We were nervous about that, but having been to Normandy to look at the horse and having talked to Nicolas [de Chambure] about Wootton Bassett and what he had coming through–he was very confident that Wootton Bassett would have a good year in France that year and he was subsequently proven right, because he had two or three Group 1 performers. The following year of course he really went to another level and his service fee rose from €6,000 to €20,000, and €20,000 to €40,000. That was a ringing endorsement of Wootton Bassett in Europe, which helped us enormously with Almanzor.”
The Wootton Bassett saga has, of course, continued, with the 13-year-old stallion adding two new Group 1 winners-Wooded (Fr) and Audarya (Fr)-to his roll of honor last year in the wake of his sale to Coolmore, where he stands this year for €100,000. Meanwhile, a select handful of yearlings was sent across the Tasman last month to get the word out early about Almanzor at Magic Millions.
“One of the things that really helped us with Almanzor was that there were three or four yearlings by him that were strategically placed at Magic Millions,” Plumptre said. “That market was very strong this year and he had a huge sale at Magic Millions. We sent one filly and our clients sent three others. Almanzor managed to get an A$800,000 colt that is going to be trained by Danny O’Brien in Melbourne, and we sold our filly for A$380,000, and we had a very good client from the South Island who sold her colt for A$340,000.
“So it was a very good story before we even got to Karaka, and it got people talking. There was a lot of feedback in Australia from Magic Millions about Almanzor, and I think by the time we opened on the first day at Karaka, most of the buying bench-whether it was online or through an agent or trainer–wanted to get their hands on one of them.”
Almanzor’s Karaka yearlings were led by a NZ$560,000 colt headed to Chris Waller, and a colt and a filly were each bought for NZ$420,000, by Bruce Perry and The Oaks Stud and trainer Tony Pike. Cambridge and Etreham teamed to buy a filly who is a half-sister to two stakes winners from Curraghmore for NZ$380,000. Cambridge and Etreham also bought three Almanzor yearlings in partnership in the North last year: a colt from Tattersalls who will go into training with Kevin Ryan, as well as a colt and a filly in Deauville who will go to Almanzor’s trainer Jean-Claude Rouget. Plumptre said they will likely look to add one more in Australia before the sales season is over.
“I think everyone down there was surprised by how well Almanzor was received,” said Nicolas de Chambure. “With any shuttle stallion, there is always a bit of a fear that the market down there isn’t going to understand or respect them. There is always a bit of a mystery there. The reports we were getting were that he was throwing very good types as he had in Europe, and it was just a question of how people down there were going to value them.”
Plumptre confirmed that Almanzor has been throwing his good looks across the board.
“Everyone knows that stallions can be gorgeous and not for whatever reason throw stock at that level,” he said. “We were very lucky that Almanzor’s first crop had a high percentage of yearlings and foals that looked like him, had that substance and bone below the knee.”
De Chambure said he thinks a warming to middle-distance sires in the Australian market has also helped Almanzor’s cause.
“Talking to people down there, it sounds like there’s a bit of a switch in the market where buyers and syndicators and trainers have a bit more time and budget for the later types and horses that look like they’ll be 3-year-old milers or 10-furlong horses,” he said. “People realize how much money there is there and sometimes there is less competition than for the early 2-year-old races. I think it’s great to see that those stallions can have a great chance and can be popular at the sales as well.”
Plumptre floated the idea that New Zealand could once again establish itself as the key source of middle-distance horses for Australia.
“I applaud the fact that they [Australia] see themselves as the best producers of sprinting horses in the world,” he said. “But 60% of the racing system in Australia is at a mile and above. So there is still a lot of prizemoney available if you have the right horse at a mile, mile and a quarter, mile and a half or two miles. Traditionally the supply chain for those horses was always New Zealand. It would be fair to say that the depth of stallions in New Zealand has dropped in the past 25 years. There is no doubt that stallions like Zabeel and his son Savabeel, and Tavistock, had all been great influences but there were only two or three of them. In the old days in New Zealand in the 1970s and 80s there were a dozen stallions producing these high-class middle-distance horses.
“There was a time too when the attention of the Australian buyer turned to Europe. The exchange rate was very good and there was a thought process that we could go and buy racehorses with a certain Timeform rating and bring them back to Australia and they would perform at that elite level, and it was cheaper to do that and better value because the European stayer was generally seen as better. I’ve got no problem with that, but I think it’s an expensive way of doing it if we can produce the right thing over here in New Zealand.”
Almanzor could quite possibly be the right thing for New Zealand, and Plumptre and de Chambure each credited one another with their role in establishing the young sire to date.
“You can’t underestimate the importance of our relationship with Etreham and Nicolas,” said Plumptre. “There is a very strong bond there which we think is fantastic for the Cambridge brand going forward. Nicolas is making a name for himself at a very famous French nursery, and it’s so far been an amazing attachment for us. We’re racing a couple of Almanzors with Nicolas here in Australia and New Zealand and we’re racing a couple Almanzors in Europe. We’ve got a lot to look forward to.”
“The folks at Cambridge have done a great job marketing this horse and getting breeders to support him,” de Chambure added. “They took a risk with this horse and it’s great to see them doing well with him down there. It was a great result for everyone involved to see the Almanzors selling so well.”
The Cambridge Stud/Haras d’Etreham connection will have another shot to continue its good fortune later this year when dual Group 1-winning sprinter Hello Youmzain (Ire) shuttles South after completing his first season at Etreham. Cambridge and Etreham partnered in the autumn of 2019 to purchase Hello Youmzain after he had won the G1 Sprint Cup, and the bay rewarded the gamble to keep him in training at four with a win in the G1 Diamond Jubilee S. at Royal Ascot last year. As was the case with Almanzor and Wootton Bassett, Hello Youmzain’s sire Kodiac has reached another stratosphere since that transaction was completed.
“At the time [of the deal] Kodiac was a good stallion, but last year he had a phenomenal year in Europe with his 2- and 3-year-olds, and Hello Youmzain winning the Diamond Jubilee at Ascot,” Plumptre said. “He went to another level as well, which again helps when you’re launching a stallion like that. I think there’s enough depth in Hello Youmzain’s pedigree as well to suggest he will get milers eventually, and as a type he has scope and length which suggests he will get milers. I don’t think he’s going to be an out-and-out speed horse.”
Plumptre said the interest in Hello Youmzain has been encouraging ahead of the horse’s arrival in New Zealand.
“We’ve got a very good group of people around him, a very good group of breeders supporting the horse,” he said. “The pedigree is very interesting to people here, it’s Danehill with a bit of Invincible Spirit in there through his dam. It’s all pretty positive stuff; those are the two lines the Australia market wants. Nicolas is very particular about the type of horse he buys into and I have no reason to believe that Hello Youmzain isn’t every bit as good a type as Almanzor, and New Zealand breeders are very big on conformation as they’re predominantly commercial sellers, so it’s important to put a horse in front of him that has that conformation, scope and substance.”
“Our broodmare band at Cambridge is probably 25 to 30% European, so we have some nice pedigrees to cross with him and we have some very good local pedigrees to cross with him,” Plumptre added of Hello Youmzain. “It’ll be most enjoyable to see his first foals in a year’s time and see what he throws.”

คาสิโน มือถือ
คาสิโน ฝากถอนไม่มีขั้นต่ำ
ไลน์ คาสิโน
คาสิโน sagame350
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริงฟรีเครดิต

Sofia Kenin: Moved to Tears, and Victory


Sofia Kenin had just beaten Ashleigh Barty, the world No. 1, to reach the final at the Australian Open last January. Still in her tennis clothes and seated on a bench in the locker room next to her friend and doubles partner, Bethanie Mattek-Sands, Kenin glanced at her phone and put her hands to her mouth.“Andy Roddick just tweeted. Oh my God, Oh my God,” Kenin said as she read aloud the former world No. 1’s message. “‘This girl has become the goods,’” Roddick wrote, urging her to win the title.“I will,” Kenin yelled into her phone. Then she cried.Kenin, 22, met Roddick when she was a 7-year-old Florida phenomenon playing exhibition matches with the former world No. 1s Jim Courier and Venus and Serena Williams. She told a reporter that she knew how to return Roddick’s 150-plus m.p.h. serve by split-stepping and hitting with a short backswing.Tears have become Kenin’s mantra. She cried from nerves before every match during last year’s Australian Open and then sobbed with joy after she beat Garbiñe Muguruza to win her first major title.She fought back tears of frustration in the middle of her French Open final-round loss to Iga Swiatek and then let them flow as she sat courtside during the trophy presentation.Kenin entered last year’s Australian Open ranked outside the top 10. Helped by a potent backhand down the line, a well-disguised drop shot and an unwavering will to win, she ended the Covid-truncated season ranked No. 4 and was named the WTA Player of the Year.The following conversation has been edited and condensed.What’s with all the tears?I don’t know. I try to handle it. I can’t go on the court crying because then it’s a big advantage for my opponent, so I have to wipe my tears, have a good warm-up, feel the ball and then start grooving in the game. That’s when I forget I was crying and just focus on the points.Do you cry before every match?I did in Australia last year. I wasn’t doing it on purpose, it was just happening. And then, I’m superstitious so I was like, I got to cry. I’m not a good actress.In last year’s final, you were at 2-2 in the third set, down 0-40 on your serve, and you hit five straight winners. How did you do that?Yeah, yeah, I know those points. I just watched them on TV again, and I got a little emotional. Those were really clutch points, probably the best points of my life.Novak Djokovic, your fellow Australian Open defending champion, became an inspiration for you last year. How did he help?I was watching his match, and I messaged him on Instagram. I was hoping he would win so I would have an excuse to congratulate him. Then he was on the practice court next to me the day before the final, and he came up and gave me some advice. He just told me to enjoy the moment and leave it all out there. I think I’m going to ask him how to handle the pressure of being a defending champion. He’s got a lot of experience with that.Not long after you won in Australia, the tour was shut down for five months because of the pandemic. Did that make you angry?It hit me hard because it was supposed to be the best thing that ever happened. Three months of practicing and everything canceled.I wasn’t in a depression, but I was really down. I didn’t want to be on the court. But when we started again, I was super excited to go out and compete, even though it was really unfortunate that there were no fans.Heading into Melbourne, what are you most excited about, and what are you most afraid of?I’m definitely happy that I get to experience being a defending champion. That’s quite special. Then, I’m most afraid to lose and lose early.How are you different from that wide-eyed 7-year-old who wanted to return Roddick’s serve?Well, I won a Slam, and I got to the final of another one. So that’s a big difference.

777ww คาสิโน
wm คาสิโน
คาสิโน ปอยเปต
คาสิโน ออนไลน์ ได้เงินจริง
สมัคร คาสิโน